Latest News

  • Wales and England's Women's Aid issue statement on 'Delilah'

    Women's Aid England and Wales issue statement on 'Delilah'

    Fri, 12th Dec 14

    Eleri Butler, CEO of Welsh Women's Aid and Polly Neate, CEO of Women's Aid Federation of Engand said:

    "We ask the Welsh Rugby Union not to actively promote singing the song 'Delilah' as many people sing this song and don't realise what it's about - it is a man singing about killing his female partner, and in England and Wales this happens to two real women every week. It's a well known and popular song, but its message is nothing to celebrate.”

    If you live in Wales you can phone the All Wales Domestic Abuse & Sexual Violence Helpline (freephone) on 0808 80 10 800. You will be able to speak personally to a professionally trained Helpline staff member.

    Read the full statement here.

  • Day 16: Welsh Women's Aid, A Day in the Life (Director of Operations, Gill Owens)

    Welsh Women’s Aid: A Day in the Life
    Director of Operations
    Gill Owens

    Every day in this role is different.  Since joining Welsh Women’s Aid in June 2014, originally to manage the business and support its staff during the period between Chief Executive Officers , that being Paula Hardy leaving us in the spring and Eleri Butler joining in November, it has been a real privilege to work in this sector and with some incredible people. I have spent a great deal of time talking with both staff and our member groups, gaining an in depth insight into the challenges faced not only by the victims that we support, day in, day out but also of the continual struggle that our members face to ensure there is sufficient support locally to help women and children fleeing domestic abuse,  find safe refuge from harm.

    It has been a whirlwind 6 months and in addition to working with our wonderful team in our Head office in Cardiff it has been my privilege to work with our delivery teams based in North Wales.  Spending time in Wrexham and Colwyn Bay Women Aid has given me first hand experience of the incredible work all our members and providers of Domestic Abuse do year in year out to ensure service users and victims are given the individual support they need, and as for our incredible staff in the All Wales Domestic Abuse and Sexual Violence helpline.

    During this 16 Days of Action Welsh Women’s Aid has released a Survivor’s story each day, detailing the incredible stories of individuals’ journeys from fear and abuse into safety and reclaiming their lives and it makes me very proud of this sector. 

  • Stories of Hope & Survival: Day 16

    Dear past!
    Thank you for all of life’s
    lessons you’ve
    given me.
    Dear future, I’m ready now.

    Anonymous

  • Day 15: Welsh Women's Aid, A Day in the Life (Refuge Co-ordinator, Joanne Hammond)

    Welsh Women's Aid, A Day in the Life

    Refuge Co-ordinator

    By Joanne Hammond

    My role as refuge co-ordinator is a diverse role which incorporates both planned and unplanned tasks and responsibilities. Over the last five years working in refuge I can truthfully say there are no two days that are ever the same. On walking into the refuge you are never quite sure what your day will consist of and what has happened prior to your arrival. This is the part of the role that I find most rewarding and positively challenges me on a daily basis.

    The role consists of supporting women and families accessing emergency accommodation from the initial contact through to their move on from refuge. This encompasses working as part of team,  key working, liaising with partnerships agencies, co-ordinating the on call rota, attending meetings, support plans, risk assessments, outcomes, house meetings, arranging activities  and managing all aspects of the day to day running of refuge.

    The day begins with updating refuges online and reading an update of the women’s/children’s files. A task list is discussed with the team to clarify what needs to be completed that day. Due to one of the women moving on from refuge in the next few weeks we met to complete list of things that need to be carried out and support plan. A busy morning continued with many of the women wanting support with contacting benefits, housing the GP and emotional support. Completed unit checks and all health and safety visual checks.

    Considerable time was spent submitting a funding application for the young people in refuge to enable them to access local activities. This took precedence as there are little or no facilities and activities aimed at young people whilst waiting to be allocated a school place.
    The afternoon continued to be busy with supporting a woman with her discretionary funding application. I attended a housing appointment to view and sign for a property, which is a rewarding part of the role to see the transition for the woman and her son from how she was on entry into refuge to now being allocated her own flat in a safe area. Tenancy support was referred to which will enable continued support and ease the transition and move on from refuge. The on call worker was updated via email with a residents list to prepare them for taking over from the daytime team. At the end of the day the women’s and children’s files were updated on the day’s events and diverted the phones to the on call worker. Such a busy day however, this is the part of the job I enjoy the experience of how diverse and rewarding the role can be.

    The 16 days of Action to End Violence Against Women is crucial to keep the message prominent in people’s minds. The campaign also assists in raising awareness of violence against women and organisations that provide support. It is encouraging to see individuals getting involved which have included current and past service users.

  • Stories of Hope & Survival: Day 15

    Why do some women get battered into submission?
    What makes a pretty face and a fist have a collision?
    Is it a sign of the times, or the easy way out?
    No room to talk only room to fight and shout.

    Hiding in a sanctuary, like a frightened fox in a hole,
    Leaving their home and work to be forced onto the dole,
    Trapped, like a prisoner, in an insecure jail,
    Mum and kids in one room, evading a gruesome male.

    Helped by many volunteers, in every possible way,
    Daily meetings held to show them the light of day,
    Looking over their shoulder whilst walking to the shops,
    A car backfires, someone running, their heart nearly stops.

    Fighting the loneliness, quite often fighting the tears,
    Hiding from her children her dreaded daily fears,
    Will she find new sanctuary behind the refuge door?
    Or will she give in to pressure and go back for more?

    Their belief in man is shattered, with the odd exception,
    Not all men are unfaithful, with violence and deception,
    For some the stay is short for some the road is long
    They say, women are the weaker sex, I say that’s wrong………

See All News

It is estimated that around 3 million women across the UK experience rape, domestic violence, forced marriage, stalking, sexual exploitation, trafficking and other forms of violence every year. This is the equivalent to the population of Wales.

Report of the Secretary General, 2006

At least 12 women die each year in the UK as a result of 'honour'-based killing

Fawcett Society (2009)

Welsh Women's Aid want domestic abuse to be recognised as a gender based issue, with appropriate services and support to be available to women and children, resulting in the eradication of all forms of violence against women.


 

 

Welsh Women's Aid needs your help. With your support we can continue our vital work, to ensure a safer and more fulfilling future for women and children in Wales. Awareness raising and prevention work is critical, and with your support we can eventually change what is accepted as a healthy relationship, and stop another generation of women and children needing to access our services. Currently 2 women a week are killed by their partner or ex partner. This is unacceptable, but we can't challenge this alone.


 


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What is domestic abuse?

What is domestic abuse?Domestic Abuse is the actual or threatened physical, emotional, psychological, sexual or financial abuse of a person by their partner, family member or someone with whom there is, or has been, a close relationship. Domestic Abuse also relates to allowing or causing a child to witness domestic abuse. For more information about the nature and effects of domestic abuse click here

If you or a friend need help...

What is domestic abuse?Domestic abuse and violence frighten and disempower women and children, and no-one wants to live in fear. For more information about getting help and support for yourself, a member of your family or a friend click here

Children and young people

What is domestic abuse?Domestic abuse affects children and young people too. In many cases children are in the same room or can hear what is happening in their home. It can affect them in many different ways. Young people can also experience domestic abuse in their own intimate relationships as they start to go out with people during their teenage years. For more information click here.

Welsh Women's Aid Services

What is domestic abuse?

WWA is the national umbrella organisation representing local Women's Aid Groups situated throughout Wales. Our member groups provide direct services for women and children who have experienced or are experiencing domestic abuse.WWA can provide specialist training, support and information to our member groups and to outside organisations.

 


We manage the All Wales Domestic Abuse and Sexual Violence Helpline, a free 24 hour, bilingual, gender neutral and confidential helpline providing support and information to anyone experiencing domestic abuse, and to individuals and organisations seeking information or advice.

 

To find out what Welsh Women's Aid can offer to external organisations, please see What We Offer